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Traymore facilitates growth in the hinterland

Article - August 27, 2012
Traymore Docks revitalized an obsolete terminal in Moengo, converting it into the port of choice for mining and timber companies active in the area
EUGENE H. PROFIJT CEO OF TRAYMORE
For decades the Moengo dock was one of the busiest docks in the republic of Suriname. In the late 90s when the mining company Suralco moved its mining front to the Coermotibo River, the Moengo dock became redundant and was sold to a private company in 1994. The new owners demolished buildings and sold them as scrap.

In 2004, Traymore N.V. bought the dock and proceeded to rehabilitate it and have it certified in order to be able to facilitate current and future activities in the Moengo area. The port was officially opened on April 19, 2008.

Eugene H. Profijt, CEO of Traymore Suriname, discusses the importance of the country’s ports – particularly the Port of Moengo – both for maintaining current business and as drivers for economic growth.

He says: “The big challenge for me was to show people that we were capable. Until now a lot of people doubted that the harbor would be a success. Mind you, we have only had the harbor two and a half years, which is a short period. There was a lot of time spent on renovations, certifying the harbor, and security, which is one of the most important things.

“We are also a member of the Caribbean Shipping Association (CSA), just to show the world that we exist. But after two and a half years we have proven that we have the right to be there. Through employment and social welfare projects, we are doing something for the people. We are also doing something to put the country on the international map.”

The Moengo company is tapping into the area’s growing economic activities, especially in the mining and forestry sectors.

"We have the biggest privately-owned oil tank farm: 50,000 barrels. We are an ISPS-certified harbor and we have invested in heavy equipment."

Eugene H. Profijt,
CEO of Traymore
Suriname


From its 53,000 barrels bunkering facility, Traymore distributes fuel to sand and gravel miners and other building material producers. Fuel is also sold to small-scale gold miners and forestry companies. Each month the port handles two fuel tankers from Trinidad and Tobago.

“We have our own fuel trucks for distribution,” says Mr. Profijt.
While container handling has not yet become reality, cargo and packed goods are already being processed. According to Mr. Profijt, container handling is delayed because of the ongoing reconstruction and upgrading of the east-west highway to French Guiana. He anticipates that some of this freight will ultimately be handled at Traymore Docks.

“We have the biggest privately-owned oil tank farm: 50,000 barrels,” adds Mr. Profijt. “We are an ISPS-certified harbor and we have invested in heavy equipment. Moengo Mineral is building a factory now, and the equipment that they are purchasing is being unloaded at our harbor. Our main business at the harbor now is fuel, getting fuel and selling it back. I hope that before the end of this year, we can get our first container shipped. That is our plan, but our main thing now is diesel oil,” he adds.
“Demand for diesel is going to grow enormously if Newmont starts – Newmont is one of the three biggest mining companies in the world. Small-scale mining will need oil as well.”

As the company grows, Mr. Profijt is well aware of his company’s corporate social responsibility and giving something back to the people of Suriname. With this in mind, Traymore is presently running a project where they pay for the schooling of 40 poor children, who otherwise could not afford to go to school.

“This year we have given 35 chairs and tables for schoolchildren. We see education as one of the most important things for people to grow,” says the CEO.

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