islamic-fashion

Hijab Style: Islamic fashion is not Burkini

The hijab, a headscarf worn by Muslim women, was presented to the fashion world as more than a religious garment.

From mid-September to late October, fashion floods every corner of the globe through the Fashion Weeks in different cities. These global storefronts tend to attract attention though their bold bets, impossible costumes, uncomfortable materials…

Is it possible to draw attention from the simplicity? Could a modest style unseat Alexander McQueen, Phillip Treacy or John Galliano boldness?

girl-with-hijab-art

That’s just what happened during the latest edition of New York Fashion Week. The hijab, a headscarf worn by Muslim women, was presented to the fashion world as more than a religious garment.

“Being upset about hijab is like being upset with Grace Kelly for wearing her iconic scarves when she used to go out.”

It seems that designer Anniesa Hasibuan has not ignored a market of over 200$ billion. The Indonesian designer has become a pioneer by introducing the hijab for the first time to New York Fashion Week. Her chiffon fabric designs, rich color varieties and necklaces shone on the fashion show and were among the most admired pieces.

Anniesa Hasibuan has not been the first to democratize the “hijab style”: Japanese retailer Uniqlo, launched a line of hijabs and skirts and tunics earlier this year. Fashion companies like Dolce & Gabbana and H&M have also committed to opening up to the Muslim market that will move over than 500$ billion dollars annually by 2019.

Thinking of Islamic fashion should not be limited to imagining long robes and unattractive women’s headscarves. Quite the opposite. There’s a world to discover. It just needs a look at Pinterest to see that there aren’t just a few Muslim women who have sense of fashion. Moreover, there are many bloggers and YouTubers who insist: “We must stop seeing the Muslim woman as a submissive stereotype for not being ‘sensual’ from the Western point of view.”

happy-hijab-girl

In an interview with The Worldfolio, Ms. Alia Khan, Founder & Chairwoman of the Islamic Fashion and Design Council (Dubai, UAE) comments that “being upset about hijab is like being upset with Grace Kelly for wearing her iconic scarves when she used to go out.”

Indonesian designer Anniesa Hasibuan has opened the door of the big “hijab style” parades. It is not unusual that Indonesia, with more than 85% of its population following Islam’s doctrines, is considered by many as the capital of Islamic fashion. And it is no surprise that Jakarta Fashion Week will run its eighth edition this October.

Will we see more hijabs at Milan Fashion Week or London Fashion Week?

Will we be able to overcome stereotypes against Islamic clothing?

About The Worldfolio

The Worldfolio provides intelligence about the economies with the highest growth potential in the world, with a focus on understanding them from within.

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